17 votes? Wow! That’s amazingly close.

eighteenbelow:

kelsonv:

kelsonv:

Remember to vote in local elections. Initiatives, council & school board members, judges, etc. affect you and your community directly even if it’s not as exciting as the Presidential race. And the people elected locally go on to build the pool of state and national candidates. If you care about 2018 or 2020, get out and vote locally to get the ball rolling.

#vote #election #ivoted

Plus between a smaller pool and a lower turnout, your vote literally makes up a bigger share of the total.

I like to remind people that a candidate I voted for once lost by exactly 17 votes.  Your vote does matter.

17 votes? Wow! That’s amazingly close.

On Tumblr

So frustrating that PackageKit & DNF still download the same updates separately instead of talking to each other.

So frustrating that PackageKit & DNF still download the same updates separately instead of talking to each other.

On Twitter

(@brionv remarks that the GNOME “updater is …. funky”)

@brionv Good way to put it. ☺️I still prefer the dnf cli for handling updates, but the guis & notifications all use PackageKit

On Twitter

I don’t like Twitter threads. In most cases, if something takes more space than 1 or 2 tweets to say, it’s easier to read as an article.

I don’t like Twitter threads. In most cases, if something takes more space than 1 or 2 tweets to say, it’s easier to read as an article.

On Twitter

It’s especially bad with very long threads, and those that aren’t crafted to make each tweet a unit. When sentences continue on from…

On Twitter

…one tweet to the next as if they’re only line breaks, it makes it hard to pick out a statement to highlight, or where to start.

On Twitter

On the plus side: Tweets are more likely to be seen, more easily shared, & people can interact as they’re posted, like a live conversation.

On Twitter

A thread that’s *crafted* to fit in 140-character chunks has a rhythm to it, like a daily comic strip collection vs. a comic book.

On Twitter

@brionv remarks: “my problem is I get 4 tweets in and wish I’d started a blog post but now it’s too late! ;)”

@brionv Yeah, at that point you’ve got to at least finish the thought!

On Twitter

And an unplanned tweetstorm gives both the writer a chance to get their ideas down quickly and the reader a chance to see them unfiltered.

On Twitter

Compared to an article, a tweetstorm provides immediacy, and any Twitter thread provides reach. But they’re still a pain to read.

On Twitter

This thread reformatted as an article:

https://hyperborea.org/journal/2017/10/thread/

On Twitter

my political stance is “end lawnmower culture”

eighteenbelow:

los-plantalones:

bigwordsandsharpedges:

princess-bowlofnoodles:

bigwordsandsharpedges:

turtletot43:

harmonicakind:

i was about to joke about how my political stance is “end lawnmower culture” but then it occurred to me that i actually Am against lawns as suburban status symbols and wastes of land that Could be used to sustain native flora & fauna and grow food for people, but no, instead they are these huge useless swaths of land that need Constant maintenance, the process of which is not only destructive, but Incredibly Loud

You know that actually is the purpose of a lawn? They started as a trend of the French monarchy – the ones revolutionaries beheaded for being self indulgent assholes.

It exists purely as a status symbol that says, “I have land but I don’t have to use it for anything productive. I can invest time, money and resources in maintaining an entirely useless crop on land I’m not farming just because it looks pretty.”

Lawns offend me.

Why have that stunted golf course in front of your suburban house if you can’t even water it? Get one of these instead.

FINALLY PEOPLE ARE BECOMING SELF AWARE. MAN MY ANCESTORS HAD IT IN THE BAG.

I made this years ago and I still get positive replies. The first step is the hardest: start small with a window box full of salad lettuce or a small patch of radishes, but make sure you start. 

Grow something, anything at all, and you’ll get better at it.

Every time I reblog this, the commentary gets better and better.

The worst part is that some municipalities actually have by-laws against growing food.  And I keep my yard relatively wild because I like the raspberry bushes and like to sustain the animals and bees in the area, but my next-door neighbour has at least twice called the city on me because it’s not as neat as she prefers.

A few years back, a local city was fighting a homeowner over their drought tolerant landscape not adhering to code…in the middle of a drought.

On Tumblr

truxillogical2: So, remember those Wanted Posters from awhile back?

eighteenbelow:

truxillogical2:

So, remember those Wanted Posters from awhile back?  Yeeeeah, and then I forgot to actually post the BIG ANNOUNCEMENT.

I’m in a book!

A new volume of Tellos, in memory of the late Mike Wieringo. Over 200 artists worked on this, and I mean, there are some BIG names.  You can see some of them here, but that’s just, like a smattering (like, I’m pretty sure George Perez is on the roster for at least one page).

All the proceeds go to the ASPCA, so hey.  You get to help puppies while getting a cool book!  Or just spread the word!

I’m just so stoked to have had a chance to be a part of this.  I’ve loved Ringo’s work since I first got my grubby little mitts on an Impulse book, and Tellos is such an icon.

Plus, I got to draw several pages of a snarky fox and an adorable dopey bear.  So.  That was fun too!

The books are only going to be available for pre-order, like, right now.  So if you want a copy, now’s the time!

That is super-cool!!  Congrats on becoming part of this 😀

On Tumblr

That’s the roof of a gazebo sticking out of the water. Correction: it’s an information kiosk.

That’s the roof of a gazebo sticking out of the water. Correction: it’s an information kiosk. Same style of roof as the picnic shelters, but not as tall. #flooded

Photo taken at: Polliwog Park

That’s the roof of a gazebo sticking out of the water.

On Twitter
On Tumblr

Correction: it’s an information kiosk. Same style of roof as the picnic shelters, but not as tall. #flooded

On Instagram

eighteenbelow says:
Oh geez, that seems pretty extreme! I’d heard you guys got a lot of rain and flooding, but I hope it’s a good thing in the long run and helps alleviate the drought.

Thanks, I hope so too. Our part of town did pretty well. We had an inch of water in our garage, but it only went halfway back (apparently it’s not level) and the only things that seem to have any damage are an old suitcase that might dry out ok, and some empty boxes. Power only went out for about a minute before it came back on, and we drove through some flooded roads yesterday before holing up at home.

This park is a basin in the hills, and apparently used to be part of the same seasonal marsh system as the preserve I’ve posted photos from. It’s all playground areas, benches, and picnic shelters. A friend who used to live here says flooded during heavy rain when she was here, so I imagine it’ll be fine when it dries out. Muddy, but the area near the pond is usually covered in duck and goose dropping anyway. Not my favorite part of the park, let me tell you.

The local paper reported one death a few miles away, believed to be the same person who went missing during a rescue from a flooding homeless camp. Lots of mudslides, flooded garages and damaged stuff, but not much structural damage. A retaining wall a few blocks from us collapsed and crushed an empty car.

Other parts of the LA area fared a lot worse, especially near the mountains, and especially areas downhill from last year’s fires, but we’re ok here.

On Tumblr

Some of the trees at the marsh are covered in what looks like thick spider webs, just in time for Halloween.

Some of the trees at the marsh are covered in what looks like thick spider webs, just in time for Halloween.

Photo taken at: Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center

Some of the trees at the marsh are covered in what looks like thick spider webs, just in time for Halloween.

Visited last weekend.

On Tumblr
On iNaturalist

eighteenbelow says:
Interesting. Some kind of cottonwood-like fluff? Southern Ontario gets these horrible tent caterpillars in late summer/early fall and they leave their gross webbing everywhere, but it doesn’t look like this.

Someone else thought it might be some kind of moss. If I’d been thinking, I would have asked about it at the visitor center afterward.

On Tumblr

@AndyBehbakht Nice! I got to stay there once on a non-Comic-Con weekend & it was weird to see the place w/o crowds

@AndyBehbakht Nice! I got to stay there once on a non-Comic-Con weekend & it was weird to see the place w/o crowds

https://hyperborea.org/journal/2008/12/san-diego-weekend/

On Twitter

@AndyBehbakht I’d love to stay there during the con one of these days (assuming I ever make it back to SDCC)

On Twitter

It’s been a banner spring for a lot of other flowering trees and bushes, but the jacarandas are just getting started.

It’s been a banner spring for a lot of other flowering trees and bushes, but the jacarandas are just getting started.

It’s been a banner spring for a lot of other flowering trees and bushes, but the jacarandas are just getting started.

#jacaranda

On Tumblr

eighteenbelow says:
These are lovely. Our flowering trees have a loooong way to catch up because of our chilly spring. Great shot!

Thanks! The last few years have been really dry – since I moved to the area, actually – that this year’s half-normal rainfall seems to have kicked all the perennials into high gear. Most of the flowers are winding down (or being trimmed off) now that the rain is done, and I’d started wondering if I’d missed the jacarandas or if the change this year had meant they hadn’t flowered. And there was my answer: A tree with leaves, flowers, and buds forming. I hadn’t missed them after all, they just run on another schedule than everything else around.

On Tumblr

Yeah, the trees vary a lot depending on which microclimate…

eighteenbelow:

kelsonv:

eighteenbelow:

kelsonv:

6 new photo(s) on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelsonv/

Great photos!  I think I should visit California in winter at some point, because I thought it would look really different.  

Thanks!

The ponds are unusual, actually – the whole area’s been built up so much that only a few fragments of the marsh habitat are left, and remaining open space near LA is mostly in the hills and mountains. Those tend toward sparse forest, chaparral, and seasonal grasslands. The taller mountains usually get snow each winter, but the lowlands don’t.

The overall climate is hot and dry in the summer and mild and wet in winter, so January and February are when the hills start turning green. In wet years there’s usually a lot of wildflowers in spring, and then the grass turns golden brown in summer as the weather heats up and the rains stop.

Every year there are a few wildfires somewhere around the state too, usually in the mountains and canyons. That used to be mainly in fall, but the last few years it’s stretched out to year-round.

Further inland the deserts are are another totally different experience, with wider temperature extremes on both ends, fascinating geology, and their own ecosystems.

I’d definitely recommend visiting when you get a chance. Out of curiosity, what were you expecting?

I didn’t expect there to be so many deciduous trees that would lose their leaves.  This looks just like Ontario in late fall or early spring, and I guess I was thinking it’d look a little more sub-tropical or desert-like.  I know northern California is more temperate, but since you live in the southern part I assumed this would be different.  So now I’ve learned something new, and thanks for the explanation!

And yeah, I really would like to visit someday.  Probably not in the heat of summer because my spouse hates those kinds of temperatures, but I’d like to see it at any time of year.

Ah, I see what you mean. Yeah, the trees vary a lot depending on which microclimate and whether they’re landscaped or wild. Most of the trees used for landscaping either don’t drop their leaves in winter or only thin out. Palm trees, eucalyptus and pine are popular. And it doesn’t get cold enough for a lot of trees that would drop their leaves in other climates, at least if they’re getting enough water. Driving around the neighborhood I’d say only about 10% of the trees have gone totally dormant.

I suspect one of the reasons so many of the trees in the marsh drop their leaves is the seasonal water access. I went up into the mountains a few weeks ago and mostly there were either small bushes and trees that were green or taller evergreen trees.

On Tumblr