I feel like the post-Crisis on Infinite Earths universe was a lot more open and creative than the New 52

I feel like the post-Crisis on Infinite Earths universe was a lot more open and creative than the New 52, which seems to be this weird combination of top-down heavy-handed editorial mandate and throw-things-at-the-wall-and-see-what-sticks. It felt like almost anything was possible.

Then again, I’m thinking of the first ~5 years or so after COIE (before it accumulated enough complexity that they started doing things like Zero Hour and all the gimmicks we now think of as exemplifying the 1990s), and we’re only 2 years into the New 52, and I do remember there being a bit of a shakedown period — and I’ve had 20 years to forget the stuff that didn’t work in the late 1980s in favor of what did. So I could be seeing it through nostalgia-colored glasses.

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The New 52 reboot *was* rushed compared to COIE.

The thing is, the New 52 reboot was rushed compared to COIE.

COIE was a 12-issue event created specifically to clean house and combine what they wanted to keep into a new reality.

Flashpoint was a stand-alone “fix the broken timeline” story that grew. Somewhere along the line, DC decided to use it as the springboard to launch the New 52. They added a double-page spread with some mumbo-jumbo about merging timelines, and drew the new costumes on Batman and Barry for the last two pages. (I can’t confirm this, but given the timeline of when Johns and Kubert started Flashpoint, when the reboot got greenlit, the story of Flashpoint itself, and all the stuff Johns talked about putting into his Flash run that didn’t make it, this makes the most sense.)

In my mind, Flashpoint and the New 52 are completely separate entities.

And speaking of things that are completely separate…

“Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato are doing amazing work.”

Yes. Yes they are.

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