Responsive Email

I was going to put together a post complaining about #email #newsletters that still assume you’re reading on a desktop and send out layouts that rely on a wide screen size and end up with 2pt type on a #mobile phone – you know, where most people read their email these days.

Then I stumbled on this #usability article by Jakob Nielsen.

From 2012.

https://www.nngroup.com/articles/mobile-email-newsletters/

On Wandering.shop

The funny thing is that #HTML is #responsive by default. In the very early days, it was *always* responsive except when you added preformatted text. Once you got a little more rendering capability (tables, images and image maps) you had people designing websites who were accustomed to fixed-size media, and the paradigm stuck.

Build for 800×600. Build for 1024×768. Hey, we have widescreen now. What do you mean the window isn’t always fullscreen?

And so on.

On Wandering.shop

Being able to apply relative sizes to everything, and being able to tweak the layout based on the logical screen size instead of physical pixels is an amazing improvement in the flexibility of anything formatted in HTML+CSS.

(And of course higher-definition displays, but a responsive layout can still make itself usable on some of those older screen sizes.)

On Wandering.shop
Expanded on Blog

IMO there are two sensible ways to handle granular push #notification preferences:1. Use the system’s …

IMO there are two sensible ways to handle granular push #notification preferences:

1. Use the system’s per-app settings for all of it. (Tusky does this, even putting your per-account preferences in the system UI)
2. Use the app’s settings for all of it, and let the system just be an on/off toggle for what you’ve chosen in the app (like it was before the system had UI for it)

#ui #usability

On Wandering.shop

Twitter increasingly replicates the feeling of a Las Vegas casino that keeps throwing shiny distractions …

increasingly replicates the feeling of a Las Vegas casino that keeps throwing shiny distractions in front of you in hopes of getting you to “engage” with it just a little bit more instead of helping you do what you’re trying to.

I went back to Tweetdeck and it was a relief because it was *simpler*.

New blog post today: Dear Twitter: Please Ditch the Clutter

https://hyperborea.org/journal/2019/07/twitter-clutter/

On Wandering.shop

The Vortex is a user-behavior pattern that begins with a single intentional interaction…

“The Vortex is a user-behavior pattern that begins with a single intentional interaction followed by a series of unplanned interactions. This unplanned chain of interactions creates a sense of being “pulled” deeper into the digital space, making the user feel out of control.”

#usability

https://www.nngroup.com/articles/device-vortex/

On Wandering.shop
On Twitter (a few words trimmed to fit)

An interesting read on usability of the Kindle Fire and 7-inch tablets in general.

An interesting read on usability of the Kindle Fire and 7-inch tablets in general. The key takeaway: A 7-inch tablet is different enough from a 10-inch tablet and from a mobile phone that it needs to be treated differently when designing UI & content.

Kindle Fire Usability Findings (Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox)

Mobile web sites work best on the 7-inch tablet. Users had great trouble touching the correct items on full sites, where UI elements are too small on the Fire screen.

RT @NNgroup: Jakob Nielsen: #Kindle #Fire #Usability currently poor: optimize for 7-inch #tablet form factor or die

On Twitter